Simple Question

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Simple Question

Postby Guest » Thu Aug 15, 2019 2:26 pm

Hello,

I'm no mathematician, nor am I any good at math, but I somehow came across this odd set of equations that seem to always work out, with an exception. I was just messing around on my calculator, when the following equations seemed to work themselves out to me.

IF a⋅b=c
THEN c/√b=x=a⋅√b
AND c/√a=y=b⋅√a
EXCEPT IF a or b=0

I will post some examples below, as proof.
DISCLAIMER: All numbers are rounded to the nearest thousandth.

Ex 1.
95⋅42=3990
3990/√42=615.670=95⋅√42
3990/√92=409.365=42⋅√95

Ex 2.
0⋅5=0
0/√5=0=0⋅√5
0/√0=undefined, cannot devide by 0
5⋅√=0

Ex 3.
3⋅9=27
27/√9=9=3⋅√9
27/√3=15.588=9⋅√3

If anyone can tell me if this has any significance, or what it has to do with, then please contact me. Let me clarify, as I have asked this on other forums, and people have only tried to solve the problems. I am not looking for a solution to the problems, I am simply looking for an explanation about how they lead to the corresponding answers, and what they could possibly be used for.

Thanks
Guest
 

Re: Simple Question

Postby HallsofIvy » Fri Mar 06, 2020 9:35 pm

Do you understand what "[tex]\sqrt{x}[/tex]" means? The square root of x is the number whose square is equal to x: [tex](\sqrt{x})^2= (\sqrt{x})(\sqrt{x})= x[/tex]. '

So from [tex]c= ab[/tex], if we divide both sides by [tex]\sqrt{b}[/tex] we get [tex]\frac{c}{\sqrt{b}}= \frac{ab}{\sqrt{b}}= \frac{a(\sqrt{b})(\sqrt{b})}{\sqrt{b}}= a\sqrt{b}[/tex].

HallsofIvy
 
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